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Season ticket holder files $1M lawsuit against Astros for delivering ‘deficient product’

Houston Astros pitcher Justin Verlander crosses his arms as he stands with his teammates at the start of their first spring training baseball workout of the season Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020, in West Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
Houston Astros pitcher Justin Verlander crosses his arms as he stands with his teammates at the start of their first spring training baseball workout of the season Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020, in West Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

HOUSTON – A season ticket holder filed a class-action lawsuit against the Houston Astros for “deceptively overcharging” for season tickets while engaging in sign-stealing, according to court documents.

Court documents revealed that Adam Wallach filed the lawsuit on Friday claiming that he was a season ticket holder between 2017 and 2020 and because of the scandal, the team put a “deficient product” on the field, which has resulted in the devaluation of tickets.

Through the lawsuit, Wallach is looking to recover damages for he calls "inappropriate increases in the … season ticket prices, diminished value of their personal seat licenses and an injunction prohibiting (season ticket holders) from raising season ticket prices for at least two years.”

The class-action lawsuit is open to all full or partial season ticket holders and accuses the Astros of gross negligence, breach of contract and violation of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices-Consumer Trade Act, among other things.

Wallach has asked for more than $1 million in damages claiming the Astros had a responsibility to uphold the MLB rules and give fans a quality game.

The lawsuit claims the Astros and season ticket holders entered into a mutual contract when fans like Wallach purchased their tickets.

By participating in sign-stealing, the Astros breached the contract by knowingly providing a deficient product that resulted in severe consequences for violating the rules, the lawsuit said.

The lawsuit claims season ticket holders are owed refunds by the Astros for and also want to prevent the team from raising season ticket prices for two years due to the sign-stealing scheme.

This is believed to be the first lawsuit of its kind filed against the Astros. Wallach filed the suit through Beaumont attorneys Mitchell A. Toups and Richard L. Coffman, although they are not the first to offer people the chance to sue the Astros.

The Hilliard Martinez Gonzales law firm in Corpus Christi shared a post on their Facebook ad Instagram trying to get season ticket holders to sign up for a class-action lawsuit.


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