Distance learning threatens to leave students with special needs behind

Distance learning threatens to leave students with special needs behind
Distance learning threatens to leave students with special needs behind

HOUSTON – When COVID-19 shut down schools, students with special needs lost weeks of critical classroom time. That’s time that Jim and Lori Mazany say really impacted their son’s education.

“The school he’s missed, the time he’s missed... He’s regressed significantly,” Jim said.

Luke Mazany, 21, is a special education student at the Katy Independent School District. He has autism and before the pandemic, he received specialized, personal teaching and was doing well in school. But he’s struggled with distance learning.

“They told me that he would get on the computer, certain times of the day and do certain school work and zoom meetings and all this stuff and that’s not school for him," Lori said. "It was a ridiculous offer and did nothing for him.”

The Mazanys say for Luke and thousands of other students like him, distance learning just doesn’t work. And they, like other parents, worry about what’s going to happen when the new school year starts in a couple of months.

Fort Bend ISD

Deena Hill who is the Director of Student Support Services for the Fort Bend Independent Schol District realizes students like Luke will need special help to catch up.

“There’s a population of our students with special ed services that absolutely don’t benefit from online instruction,” Hill said.


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