Top takeaways from women’s Sweet 16 and Elite 8 games

FILE - In this March 20, 2021, file photo the March Madness logo is shown on the court during the first half of a men's college basketball game in the first round of the NCAA tournament at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. A Supreme Court case being argued this week amid March Madness could erode the difference between elite college athletes and professional sports stars. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
FILE - In this March 20, 2021, file photo the March Madness logo is shown on the court during the first half of a men's college basketball game in the first round of the NCAA tournament at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. A Supreme Court case being argued this week amid March Madness could erode the difference between elite college athletes and professional sports stars. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File) (Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

San Antonio is home to the NCAA Women’s Tournament, and three Texas schools were represented in the Sweet 16. Here’s a look at how they did on the second weekend in San Antonio:

TEXAS A&M

The Aggies and Gary Blair were the earliest to lose, bowing out in the Sweet 16 to Arizona. The Aggies ran through most of the SEC, picking up the 2nd seed, but ran into Arizona star Aari McDonald, who scored 31 on them.

Blair, a National Championship-winning coach, should have the Aggies back into the deep parts of the tournament next year.

BAYLOR

A controversial last-second non-call helped knock the powerful Bears out of the tournament. Baylor built a 53-44 lead vs. No. 1 seed UConn before DiDi Richards hurt her leg. From there, UConn went on a 20-2 run with the Bears missing the 2020 NCAA Defensive Player of the year. Baylor kept it close, but lost when refs didn’t call a foul on a late shot from DiJonai Carrington, who was defended by two UConn players.4

TEXAS

The Longhorns pulled two huge upsets in the second round and Sweet 16, beating 3-seed UCLA and 2-seed Maryland on their way to the Elite 8. First-year coach Vic Schaefer is familiar with the Final Four, taking his Mississippi State Lady Bulldogs to the NCAA Finals back-to-back seasons in 2017 and 2018. Schaefer grew up in Houston, starring at Houston Lutheran before coaching basketball and tennis at Houston Milby.

Schaefer and the Longhorns couldn’t overcome No. 1 seed South Carolina and Dawn Staley’s powerhouse squad.

The Longhorns bowed out in the Elite 8, losing 62-34 to the Gamecocks.


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