Man at center of Houston police brutality case, Chad Holley, charged with capital murder

Holley has long criminal past

HOUSTON - Chad Holley, the man who was at the center of one of Houston’s biggest police brutality cases, has been charged with capital murder.

Police said Holley, 22, is charged in the Sept. 21 shooting of a man who was being robbed outside Northline Terrace apartments, in the 100 block of E. Crosstimbers St.

Holley is charged with the Sept. 21 killing of David Trejo-Gonzalez, 42, a construction worker, who was walking from his car to his apartment when he was confronted by Holley, who demanded his money, police said.

VIDEO: Surveillance shows Houston officers beating Chad Holley during a burglary arrest

During the robbery, Trejo-Gonzalez was shot to death. After the shooting, Holley jumped into a "low-rider"-style white truck, where an accomplice was waiting for him, according to authorities.

Trejo-Gonzalez's neighbor, Griselda Morales, said he was a quiet man who never caused trouble.

"It is very unfair what happened to him," Morales said in Spanish.

Trejo-Gonzalez's brother told Channel 2 that there is a still a second suspect on the loose and it scares him.

Although Holley is in jail, family members said they have moved and changed their phone numbers to be safe.

Holley was in custody on an unrelated, misdemeanor theft charge when he was charged with capital murder in the Trejo-Gonzalez case.

Houston Police Union President Ray Hunt said, "You just don't give somebody probation on a second burglary when they've already had one burglary conviction."

David Trejo-Gonzalez

Community activist Quanell X, who represented Holley and his family during the beating case, released a statement Monday that read: "I've had a chance to speak with the Holley family and I've spoken to Chad. He vigorously denies he has killed anyone. I've known Chad since he was 15 years old. Chad has had many problems, but the Chad Holley I know, I would be hard pressed to believe he's a killer. I promised Chad Holley's mother on her deathbed that I would keep an eye on Chad, who is not a perfect young man, but God is not through with him yet. I will reserve judgment and I ask the public to do so also until we learn all the facts. I will be in court tomorrow with Chad's fiancee, his children and family."

Holley became an international symbol of police brutality in April 2010 when surveillance video showed Houston police officers beating and kicking him during a burglary arrest. Seven officers were fired, and three were convicted of official suppression, a misdemeanor.

Since that time, Holley has had several brushes with the law. He was found guilty on the original burglary charge and then convicted for a second burglary in 2012, for which he received deferred adjudication, a form of probation.

Holley was in custody on an unrelated, misdemeanor theft charge when he was charged with capital murder in the Trejo-Gonzalez case.

Houston Police Union president Ray Hunt said, "You just don't give somebody probation on a second burglary when they've already had one burglary conviction."

Police are searching for a second suspect in connection with Gonzalez’ murder.

Holley is scheduled to make his first court appearance on the capital murder charge Tuesday morning.

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