There are still places where you are required to wear a mask after Abbott’s order

FILE - In this July 7, 2020, file photo, a visitor wearing a mask to protect against the spread of COVID-19 passes a sign requiring masks in San Antonio. Texas on Tuesday, March 2, 2021, became the biggest state to lift its mask rule, joining a growing movement by governors and other leaders across the U.S. to loosen COVID-19 restrictions despite pleas from health officials not to let down their guard yet. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

HOUSTON – Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive order last week that lifted the state’s capacity limits and mask mandate on March 10.

However, there are still places where people are required to wear a mask even after Abbott’s order took effect.

Businesses

Abbott’s order does allow businesses to use coronavirus-mitigation measures, such as limiting capacity and requiring masks to be worn by customers. It can be equated to a typical “no shoes, no shirt, no service” policy.

Schools

The order allows public schools to operate under the minimum health protocols issued by the Texas Education Agency. Private schools and higher education institutions are encouraged to follow similar standards.

Read what Houston-area school districts are saying about the mask policy here.

Federal property

According to an executive order signed by President Joe Biden on Jan. 20, masks are required to be worn by members of the federal workforce, on-site federal contractors and other people in federal buildings and on federal lands. The order also requires physical distancing to be observed.

Planes, trains, buses and more

Another order signed by Biden on Jan. 21, requires people using public transit and at ports of entry to the county to wear masks. The order covers airports, commercial aircraft, trains, public maritime vessels including ferries, intercity bus services and all forms of public transportation as defined in section 5302 of title 49 in the United States Code.


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