Hurricane categories: What do they mean, exactly?

700,000 homes, businesses without power after hurricane hits Gulf Coast
700,000 homes, businesses without power after hurricane hits Gulf Coast

Eta is the latest storm to be top of mind -- especially for those in Florida.

In fact, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis issued an expanded emergency declaration to include 13 counties along or near the Gulf coast, adding them to South Florida counties. DeSantis also asked for an early emergency order from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to free resources needed to tackle the storm, according to The Associated Press.

How familiar are you with all the storm terms and hurricane categories?

Do you know the difference between a Category 2 storm and a Category 5?

The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale is a 1 to 5 rating, based on a hurricane’s sustained wind speed, according to the National Hurricane Center.

This scale estimates potential property damage.

“Hurricanes reaching Category 3 and higher are considered major hurricanes because of their potential for significant loss of life and damage. Category 1 and 2 storms are still dangerous, however, and require preventative measures,” this NHC website said.

Fun fact: In the western North Pacific, the term “super typhoon” is used for tropical cyclones with sustained winds exceeding 150 mph.


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