5 historically Black landmarks and museums to visit around Houston

On June 19, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger stood on the balcony of the building and declared that all slaves were free, marking the date of the historic Juneteenth celebrations in Texas.
On June 19, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger stood on the balcony of the building and declared that all slaves were free, marking the date of the historic Juneteenth celebrations in Texas. (galvestonhistory.org)

HOUSTON – From the balcony of Ashton Villa where slaves were declared free to the preserved Yates house in Freedman’s Town, there is a rich history in Houston.

Here are five Houston-area historic landmarks and museums that showcase Black history and what to know about them.

1859 Ashton Villa

2328 Broadway Avenue J, Galveston

On June 19, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger stood on the balcony of the building and declared that all slaves were free, marking the date of the historic Juneteenth celebrations in Texas, according to BlackPast.

Buffalo Soldiers National Museum

3816 Caroline St., Houston

The Buffalo Soldiers National Museum tells the story of the historic Buffalo Soldiers, and the history of African Americans in the US military.


About the Author: