The Eyes of Texas podcast, episode 3: Bat World

Episode 3, Season 1

By Brandon Walker - Reporter
KPRC2

WEATHERFORD, Texas - Amanda Lollar’s mission is to save every bat in Texas, if not the world. Yes. Bats.

Lollar nurtures them, from her sanctuary, Bat World, which she founded in 1994. She didn’t start out as a fan, she admits.  

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She didn’t know that much about bats and believed many of the myths about the animals. That all changed one summer day in 1988.  

Lollar stumbled across a bat, injured and suffering in an unrelenting Texas sun on a sidewalk. She scooped it up and cared for it. Little did she know, that single act of compassion, would forever change her life.  

Today, Bat World Sanctuary is housed on a 13-acre campus in Weatherford, Texas. That’s west of Fort Worth.  

The organizations’ reach has spread, too, including an international branch called Bat World ReWild in South Africa. 

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More about Episode 3 of Season 1:

Different Species Living Together

Treating Bats

 A Bat Named Tinker Bell

LIL DRAC:

This is the first video Amanda Lollar produced. It tells the story of Lil Drac, the orphaned Short-tailed Fruit Bat who would rock itself after a feeding. The video has been viewed millions of times.

RESCUING TRAPPED BATS:

In the episode, we shared the story of team Bat World being called to remove nearly 100 free-tailed bats, which had become trapped in several businesses in downtown Mineral Wells, Texas. Here’s video of the rescue process. 

TRIMMING OVERGROWN NAILS ON RESCUED FLYING FOX:

Some of the bats taken to Bat World Sanctuary were pet surrenders. In this video, Amanda and her team work to clip the bats’ overgrown nails, while making sure its belly was full, too. 

FEEDING AN ORPHANED BAT:

Team Bat World often rescues orphaned bats, which aren’t developed enough to fly or feed themselves. In this video, Amanda feeds as rescued orphaned short-tailed fruit bat. 

BAT WATCHING SITES:

Texas is a batty state. No, really. It is home to 32 of the 47 bat species found in the United States, according to the Texas Parks and Wildlife. Interested in checking out the bat colony nearest to you Follow the link.

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