Lone Star Sadness: Horns, Aggies form Axis of Underachievers

Texas running back Keaontay Ingram (26) reacts after he was stopped short of a touchdown on a run against TCU during the second half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Texas running back Keaontay Ingram (26) reacts after he was stopped short of a touchdown on a run against TCU during the second half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

At the top of USA Today's most recent revenue rankings for college athletic departments are Texas and Texas A&M.

Both had revenues of more than $200 million for the 2018-19 school year. Ohio State was the only other school to crack the $200 million mark.

The Longhorns and Aggies seemingly have it all: revenue, resources and location. No state produces more major college football players than Texas.

Texas and Texas A&M have everything needed to put out a national championship-level football program. Right?

Apparently not. The erstwhile rivals remain stuck in a cycle of disappointment. The Aggies and Longhorns refuse to play each other but combine to form an Axis of Underachievers in the Lone Star State.

The latest failures came Saturday. No. 9 Texas and No. 13 Texas A&M were two of eight ranked teams to lose, including six to unranked teams.

The wildness started with Texas getting upset at home by TCU — though at this point calling Frogs over 'Horns an upset is to ignore recent history. Since coach Gary Patterson and TCU joined the Big 12 — with the blessing of Texas — the Frogs are 7-2 against the Longhorns.

That includes 3-1 since Texas hired Tom Herman to make the Longhorns great again. Herman has done better than his predecessor, Charlie Strong, but no better than the raggedy end of Mack Brown's tenure at Texas. The Longhorns are still routinely losing to Big 12 competitors who operate on half the revenue and stock their rosters with far fewer recruiting stars.