MLB owners, players revert to salary squabbles of old

Vista area del Yankee Stadium en Nueva York, el jueves 26 de marzo de 2020. (John Woike/Samara Media va AP)
Vista area del Yankee Stadium en Nueva York, el jueves 26 de marzo de 2020. (John Woike/Samara Media va AP)

NEW YORK – Baseball owners and players have reverted to form -- the type displayed over the past half-century during eight work stoppages filled with salary squabbles.

Players proposed to resume the sport in the coronavirus pandemic with a 114-game regular season and full prorated salaries, leaving each player with approximately 70% of what he had been slated to earn.

That proposal was made Sunday, five days after Major League Baseball’s plan for an 82-game season with additional pay cuts that would leave each player taking in 23-47% of his original pay, with the highest earners accepting the biggest cuts.

MLB claims an additional $640,000 would be lost with each extra regular-season game played. The union has said it doesn’t believe those calculations and a sked MLB for more economic documents and data.

Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred discussed the next move with owners on Monday.

If spring training is to resume in mid-June followed by opening day at around the start of July, a deal would have to be reached by next week.

Players and clubs agreed March 26 to “complete the fullest 2020 championship season and postseason that is economically feasible,” consistent with three provisions:

-- no government restrictions on playing in front of fans at regular-season ballparks