Eva Longoria is famous for her acting, but she’s increasingly recognized as a political player in Texas and beyond

Actor Eva Longoria spoke in September before the arrival of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden at a Hispanic Heritage Month event in Florida.                    Credit: REUTERS/Leah Millis
Actor Eva Longoria spoke in September before the arrival of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden at a Hispanic Heritage Month event in Florida. Credit: REUTERS/Leah Millis

A few weeks ago, Texas actor Eva Longoria and her pal, Republican-turned-Biden-supporter Ana Navarro-Cárdenas, unintentionally caused a ruckus while campaigning on behalf of former Vice President Joe Biden at a strip mall in Miami.

Situated at a socially distanced campaign event at a Colombian restaurant between a barber shop and day care, Longoria was a focal point of adoration and political aversion. Some young girls came out of the day care and immediately recognized the actor from the 2019 live-action Dora the Explorer movie.

“They wanted to take a picture with Dora’s mom,” Navarro-Cárdenas recently recalled to The Texas Tribune. “Then some ... Latino Trump supporters came out of a barber shop and starting screaming ‘Communist’ at her.

“That’s what an afternoon with Eva is like,” Navarro-Cárdenas laughed. “It was a typical day in Miami with Eva Longoria.”

It is not unusual, even in a pandemic, for a Hollywood actor to hit the campaign trail for a Democratic presidential nominee. Dating back at least as far as President John F. Kennedy and Frank Sinatra’s Rat Pack, Hollywood has been attracted to national campaigns — the Beverly Hills fundraisers, the campaigning and, more recently, social media performative politics. And lately, Texas has become a trendy cause for the Hollywood left, with the stars of “Seinfeld” hosting a fundraiser for the state party and a legion of celebrities urging their social media followers to donate to the cause of turning the state blue.

But Longoria’s activism for the party stands out for both its persistence and its intensity.

The star best known for her time on the “Desperate Housewives” television show has traveled to Florida to rally voters for Biden, she frequently participates in conference calls and Zoom meetings with party activists and strategists, and over the years she co-founded two political groups devoted to rallying the Latino vote. This summer, she served as host of the Democratic National Convention, marking the third time she’s spoken at the party’s premier national event.

“I don’t know about you, but after all the attacks and the insults, I don’t just want Donald Trump out of office, but I want the Latino community to be the decisive group that votes him out of office,” she told voters in Kissimmee, Florida, this fall. “I want to show our pride and our strength and our power as a community.”