40 people arrested in Austin during weekend protests

Demonstrators face members of the Austin Police Department as they gather in downtown Austin, Texas, Thursday, June 4, 2020, to protest the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis. Floyd died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day.(AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Demonstrators face members of the Austin Police Department as they gather in downtown Austin, Texas, Thursday, June 4, 2020, to protest the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis. Floyd died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day.(AP Photo/Eric Gay) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

AUSTIN, Texas – Forty people were arrested over two nights of weekend protests in Austin, police said Monday.

The majority of the 40 arrests were made downtown near the corner of 4th Street and Congress Avenue, the site of a makeshift memorial for Garrett Foster, a man who was fatally shot during a Black Lives Matter on July 25. Charges ranged from obstructing a highway to interfering with public duties and assaulting an officer.

A Dallas law firm identified the man who shot him as Sgt. Daniel Perry, a soldier at Fort Hood.

Perry has not been charged, and Austin police have not named him as a suspect in their investigation. A call was put out Thursday by Austin officers asking the public to come forward if they had relevant information.

Attorney Clint Broden, of Broden & Mickelsen, who is representing Perry, said his client shot Foster from inside his car in self-defense after he said Foster raised an assault rifle in Perry's direction.

Austin police renewed their plea Monday for any witnesses to the confrontation and shooting to come forth with what they saw. The Austin Police Department posted images on its social media of persons that detectives hope will provide statements.

Broden told The Associated Press on Monday that his client's earlier social media posts denouncing the protests were being taken out of context and that saying they showed his client went to Austin with the intention of interacting with protesters “is not serving the truth.”

“If you look at them, they are clearly supporting President Trump based on President Trump's concerns about violent protests,” Broden said.