Steep drop in national security surveillance during pandemic

FILE - This Thursday, June 6, 2013 file photo shows the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The number of targets of secretive surveillance in national security investigations fell sharply last year amid the coronavirus pandemic and continued scrutiny of the FBIs wiretapping authorities arising from the Russia investigation.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
FILE - This Thursday, June 6, 2013 file photo shows the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The number of targets of secretive surveillance in national security investigations fell sharply last year amid the coronavirus pandemic and continued scrutiny of the FBIs wiretapping authorities arising from the Russia investigation. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File) (Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

WASHINGTON – The number of targets of secretive surveillance in national security investigations fell sharply last year in large part because of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a government report released Friday.

The drop in eavesdropping targets under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which among other things empowers the FBI to monitor the communications inside the United States of people suspected of being agents of a foreign power, followed a decline the year before after several years of substantially larger numbers.

U.S. officials say the statistics are known to fluctuate from year to year because of various factors, but that in 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic "likely influenced target behavior, which in turn may have impacted some of the numbers reported for that year.”

“The pandemic was the single event with the biggest impact to human behavior worldwide since the Second World War," said Ben Huebner, the civil liberties chief at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which oversees the nation's spy agencies. "That means it also had an impact on our appropriate foreign intelligence targets.”

The report from the ODNI is the eighth annual version of a document that was first released in the aftermath of disclosures of classified programs by former contractor Edward Snowden. It is designed to lend transparency to how the government wields some of its most intrusive and powerful national security surveillance powers.

Officials who briefed reporters said the restrictions enacted around the world on movement and large gatherings may have decreased the number of potential people or groups to surveil. They declined to elaborate further on how the pandemic affected intelligence gathering.

While there has been renewed scrutiny of the FBI's wiretapping authorities arising from the fallout of its investigation into ties between Russia and Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign, there was no discernible change in courts' willingness to approve surveillance warrants or any directive from Trump administration officials not to use those authorities, officials said.

The number of surveillance targets, under provisions allowing for surveillance with warrants of people suspected of being agents of a foreign power, dropped from 1,059 in 2019 to 451 last year, according to the report.