Posting a photo of your COVID-19 vaccination card on social media poses threat of identity theft, BBB warns

FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020 file photo, a county health department worker fills out a vaccination record card before administering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to emergency medical workers and healthcare personnel at the Chester County Government Services Center in West Chester, Pa. The first coronavirus vaccines in the U.S. require two shots taken weeks apart, and you'll be given a record card so you know when to go back for the second dose. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020 file photo, a county health department worker fills out a vaccination record card before administering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to emergency medical workers and healthcare personnel at the Chester County Government Services Center in West Chester, Pa. The first coronavirus vaccines in the U.S. require two shots taken weeks apart, and you'll be given a record card so you know when to go back for the second dose. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

The Better Business Bureau is warning those who have received their COVID-19 vaccine to not share a photo of their vaccination card on social media.

According to the BBB, sharing a photo of a vaccination card poses a threat of identity theft as it displays self-identifying information including a person’s full name, date of birth, and where they received the COVID-19 vaccine.

Additionally, the BBB warns that photos of COVID-19 vaccination cards shared on social media can help scammers create phony versions.

“Sharing your personal information isn’t the only issue. Scammers in Great Britain were caught selling fake vaccination cards on eBay and TikTok,” the BBB said in a release. “It’s only a matter of time before similar cons come to the United States and Canada. Posting photos of your card can help provide scammers with information they can use to create and sell phony ones.”

Before sharing news that you’ve received the COVID-19 vaccine, BBB recommends the following:

  • Share your vaccine sticker or use a profile frame instead. If you want to post about your vaccine, there are safer ways to do it. You can share a photo of your vaccine sticker or set a frame around your profile picture.
  • Review your security settings. Check your security settings on all social media platforms to see what you are sharing and with whom. If you only want friends and family to see your posts, be sure that’s how your privacy settings are configured.

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