New video shows fatal police shooting of Black man in LA

Balloons, candles and flowers are left on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020, as a memorial for Dijon Kizzee where he was fatally shot by Los Angeles sheriff's deputies the day before in the Westmont section of Los Angeles. Kizee, a Black man who deputies said was stopped for riding his bicycle in violation of vehicle codes, was fatally shot when he dropped a bundle of items that included a gun, authorities said, setting off a protest march to a nearby sheriff's station in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)
Balloons, candles and flowers are left on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020, as a memorial for Dijon Kizzee where he was fatally shot by Los Angeles sheriff's deputies the day before in the Westmont section of Los Angeles. Kizee, a Black man who deputies said was stopped for riding his bicycle in violation of vehicle codes, was fatally shot when he dropped a bundle of items that included a gun, authorities said, setting off a protest march to a nearby sheriff's station in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

LOS ANGELES – A grainy video posted Wednesday shows the fatal shooting of a Black man by Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies after he was stopped on a bicycle for a traffic violation, but the video does not confirm the police allegation that he “made a motion" for a gun.

Dijon Kizzee was shot and killed Monday afternoon in South Los Angeles. The video, obtained by the Los Angeles Times, shows the 29-year-old Kizzee scuffling with a deputy on a sidewalk. Kizzee broke free, stumbled and fell to the ground and two deputies opened fire.

Police have said a gun fell out when Kizzee dropped a jacket as he fell to the ground and he “made a motion” for the weapon — prompting deputies to open fire. But the video does not confirm whether that happened because a fence obstructs the view at that period in the sequence of events.

Kizzee's death came after another police shooting victim, Jacob Blake, was hit in the back and paralyzed last month in his hometown of Kenosha, Wisconsin. Blake's shooting prompted large and violent protests in Kenosha. There have been two much smaller, peaceful protests in Los Angeles for Kizzee.

The shootings of Kizzee and Blake show the need for a national standard on police use of force to prevent more killings of Black men and increase accountability and transparency, said Lynda Williams, president of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives.

“It just hurts to see this recurring over and over,” she said. “It's just incredulous to think that a bicycle stop has led to deadly force.”

Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, the Blake family's lawyer, announced Wednesday that he also is representing Kizzee's relatives and denounced the fatal shooting.

“We stand with Dijon’s family in demanding justice and transparency into this despicable and tragic killing perpetrated by Los Angeles County officers," Crump said in a statement. "When officers shoot first and ask questions later, precious lives are lost and police lose credibility and trust from those they are sworn to protect.”