A third of Medicare enrollees with coronavirus ended up in the hospital. A quarter of them died

FILE - In this April 20, 2020, file photo, resident physician Leslie Bottrell stands outside a room at an Intensive Care Unit as a nurse suctions the lungs of a COVID-19 patient at St. Joseph's Hospital in Yonkers, N.Y. A U.S. government report says death rates are 12 times higher for coronavirus patients with chronic illnesses than for others who become infected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report Monday, June 15 highlights the dangers posed by these conditions. They include heart disease, diabetes and chronic lung ailments, such as asthma or emphysema.  (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE - In this April 20, 2020, file photo, resident physician Leslie Bottrell stands outside a room at an Intensive Care Unit as a nurse suctions the lungs of a COVID-19 patient at St. Joseph's Hospital in Yonkers, N.Y. A U.S. government report says death rates are 12 times higher for coronavirus patients with chronic illnesses than for others who become infected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report Monday, June 15 highlights the dangers posed by these conditions. They include heart disease, diabetes and chronic lung ailments, such as asthma or emphysema. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

(CNN) – One-third of Medicare recipients diagnosed with Covid had to be hospitalized, and more than a quarter of that group died, according to federal data released Monday.

The report, based on Medicare claims filed between January and mid-May, found that more than 325,000 beneficiaries were diagnosed with coronavirus and nearly 110,000 of them were hospitalized.

And 28% of those who were hospitalized died, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Almost the same share went home.

Coronavirus hospitalizations have cost Medicare $1.9 billion in its fee-for-service program, which pays providers for services rendered, or about $23,100 per patient, on average.

The data, which is preliminary and will change as more claims are processed, provides a look into who proved vulnerable to coronavirus. It confirmed that the elderly, those with chronic conditions, lower-income people and Black and Hispanic Americans have been more affected by the pandemic.

"The data also confirms long-understood and stubbornly persistent disparities in health outcomes for racial and ethnic minorities," said Seema Verma, the agency's administrator.

Overall, there were nearly 525 cases per 100,000 Medicaid enrollees.

But there were more than 1,100 cases per 100,000 Black enrollees, and nearly 700 diagnoses per 100,000 Hispanic recipients. The rate for Asian recipients was 450 and for Whites was 425 per 100,000.