Where to watch the Oct. 14 solar eclipse in Texas

Willing to travel to see the annular eclipse in October? There are plenty of scenic spots in Texas where you can witness the celestial event.

An annular solar eclipse as observed in Suining, Sichuan province January 15, 2010. VCP (Photo by Jie Zhao/Corbis via Getty Images) (Jie Zhao, Jie Zhao)

A ring of sunshine will blaze above parts of Texas on Oct. 14 as the moon glides between the sun and Earth.

During the solar spectacle, officially called an annular solar eclipse, the new moon will pass in front of and partly obscure the sun, leaving a ring of light around its edges. Astronomers call it a “ring of fire.”

The ring of fire will be visible in Texas across a narrow band, starting in Denver City at about 11:41 a.m. It will then sweep southeast through the Permian Basin and the Hill Country to the Texas Coastal Bend, ending in Port Aransas at about 12:01 p.m. Outside of the strip, observers will see a crescent sun, or a partial solar eclipse. The closer they are to the centerline, the more of the sun will be blotted out.

In the Houston metropolitan area, outside the path of annularity, the sun will be about 90% obscured, said KPRC 2 Meteorologist Anthony Yanez.

Of course what you get to see wherever you are ultimately depends on the weather forecast.

For astronomy enthusiasts willing to expend the effort to see the annular eclipse in all it’s glory because a partial eclipse simply wouldn’t satisfy, there’s good news — There are plenty of scenic spots in Texas where you can witness the October event.

Below, find a list of eclipse viewing events happening in locales within the path of annularity.


Midland, 11:43:25 a.m.

Time in Annularity/Ring of Fire: 4:55

Utopia, 11:49:58 a.m.

Time in Annularity/Ring of Fire: 4:58

  • Four Sisters Ranch, in Utopia, will host a weekend music festival dubbed Eclipse Utopia, accommodating as many as 1,500 attendees. The “intimate campout gathering” promises “unparalleled views and an excellent eclectic musical lineup.”

Ingram, 11:50:07 a.m.

Time in Annularity/Ring of Fire: 4:23

  • The Hill Country Arts Foundation will host a viewing event at Stonehenge II. The event will have both parking and limited RV sites, along with food trucks, a beer tent, and “hygiene stations.” The day will end with a performance by the New Buddy Holly Band.

Kerrville, 11:50:22 a.m.

Time in Annularity/Ring of Fire: 4:15

  • The Welcome Home Festival, at Quiet Valley Ranch, runs from Friday to Sunday with such artists as Kinky Friedman, Michael Hurley, Kimya Dawson, and Big Thief’s Adrianne Lenker. During the eclipse, on Saturday, there will be a “sound bath” with the Brother Brothers.

San Antonio, 11:52:08 a.m.

Time in Annularity/Ring of Fire: 4:21

Corpus Christi, 11:55:48 a.m.

Time in Annularity/Ring of Fire: 5:02

  • Space.com highlighted Padre Island National Seashore, and Whitecap Beach specifically, as the best location to get the longest view of the ring of fire.

Port Aransas, 11:56:24 a.m.

Time in Annularity/Ring of Fire: 4:50

  • UT’s Marine Science Institute will host a viewing event “fun for the whole family” at the Patton Center for Marine Science Education in Port Aransas.

State parks in the path of annularity

There are 17 Texas state parks in the path of the annular eclipse. Several are holding eclipse viewing parties.

Where would you like to watch the Oct. 14 solar eclipse in Texas? Let us know in the comments!


About the Author:

Briana Zamora-Nipper joined the KPRC 2 digital team in 2019. When she’s not hard at work in the KPRC 2 newsroom, you can find Bri drinking away her hard earned wages at JuiceLand, running around Hermann Park, listening to crime podcasts or ransacking the magazine stand at Barnes & Noble.