How extended screen time can affect a child’s vision and ways to encourage a ‘screen staycation’ this summer

While summer is the time for vacation, it can also be when kids spend most of their days indoors, watching TV, reading books or playing on devices – a combination which can contributes to the progression of myopia.

While summer is the time for vacation, it can also be when kids spend most of their days indoors, watching TV, reading books or playing on devices – a combination which can contributes to the progression of myopia.

Myopia, also known as nearsightedness, is a common disease in which people can see close objects clearly, but objects far away appear blurred. Myopia continues to worsen over time and can even lead to serious eye conditions.

According to the Global Myopia Awareness Coalition, 76 extra minutes outside a day can reduce the risk of myopia by 50%.

The coalitions is encouraging families to spend more time outdoors this summer and take a “screen staycation” – a challenge to go 24 hours without any screens.

On July 20, Haylie Duff and Dr. Nathan Bonilla-Warford, ‘Dr. Nate’, appeared on KPRC 2+ to discuss the link between the increase of myopia in children and extended screen time, how early intervention can slow the progression of myopia and share tips on how to take part in a “Screen Staycation” this summer.

For more information visit www.myopiaawareness.org.