Corelle responds to viral post about its vintage dishware, lead exposure

Corelle's reaction highlighted in now-viral post about vintage dishware. (Amanda Cochran, NH Public Health Services)

Corelle is responding to a now-viral post about its vintage dishware and its safety.

New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services’ Public Health Services page posted a warning on Facebook about Corelle pieces.

“If you own Corelle® dinnerware from before 2005, consider removing it from your kitchen cabinets due to concerns for high levels of Lead. Corelle® recommends using their pre-2005 dishes as ‘decorative pieces.’ Discover which patterns contain Lead: http://ow.ly/kMkN50JeqMn.”

The post that now has more than 77,000 shares has been updated to say this:

“UPDATE: Elevated lead levels are most dangerous in young children and pregnant mothers. The FDA started to regulate lead-levels in dishware in 1971. Decades of daily use can cause deterioration of the paint, exposing the lead and making it easily ingestible. This post is an educational opportunity for people to know that vintage dishes can be a source of lead exposure. Learn more at: https://www.dhhs.nh.gov/.../lead-poisoning-prevention.... If you own Corelle® dinnerware from before 2005, consider removing it from your kitchen cabinets due to concerns for high levels of Lead. Corelle® recommends using their pre-2005 dishes as “decorative pieces”. Discover which patterns contain Lead: http://ow.ly/kMkN50JeqMn

In the comments on the post, Corelle’s official account shared this statement:

“We are very proud of our Corelle products, which are made of Vitrelle, a tempered glass consisting of glass laminated into three layers. Corelle was first introduced by Corning over 50 years ago and in 2000 started to be manufactured by the company known today as Instant Brands. All Corelle products meet the safety standards at the time of manufacturing.

“As manufacturing and regulatory practices have evolved, so have Corelle products. We routinely test Corelle products for lead and cadmium contents at internationally recognized, third-party testing laboratories. This testing confirms that our products comply with applicable federal and state safety regulations.

“Corelle dinnerware has come in many different patterns over the years since it was first introduced by Corning and continued with Instant Brands, and many vintage/legacy pieces have become cherished collectors’ items. Before 2000, and before tighter lead content safety regulations, a small amount of lead was an ingredient in the decorating process of many household products. Given the recent demand for use of vintage products every day, we are further investigating pre-2000 Corelle products to confirm they comply with today’s safety standards – and whether it’s okay to use pre-2000 product as everyday dinnerware.

“Whatever way you choose to enjoy your Corelle products, either decoratively or at your table every day, we hope you enjoy them as much as we do.”

Do you have vintage Corelle? Do you use it or is it decorative? Let us know in the comments.


About the Author:

Amanda Cochran is an Edward R. Murrow award-winning journalist. She specializes in Texas features, consumer and business news and local crime coverage.