Body recovered in Richmond identified as missing Allison Chapman Kempe, authorities say

RICHMOND, Texas – The body of missing Allison Chapman Kempe, a 41-year-old resident of Richmond, Texas, has been recovered, according to local authorities.

The Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office told KPRC 2 the missing woman’s car was found Monday morning with Kempe inside.

Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office Lt. Dalia Simons said in a news conference Monday that there is “no indication of foul play,” and that official identification of the body and cause of death is pending autopsy.
Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office Lt. Dalia Simons said in a news conference Monday that there is “no indication of foul play,” and that official identification of the body and cause of death is pending autopsy.

Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office Lt. Dalia Simons said in a news conference Monday that there is “no indication of foul play.” The body was positively identified as Kempe on Tuesday, officials said. The preliminary cause of death is due to accidental drowning, according to officials. Laboratory analysis is currently pending.

Authorities in Fort Bend County said a woman's body was found in the search for Allison Chapman Kempe.
Authorities in Fort Bend County said a woman's body was found in the search for Allison Chapman Kempe.

“The investigation of this tragic incident is ongoing by our team,” said Sheriff Eric Fagan. “I request that your thoughts, prayers and respect for privacy be extended to Allison’s family during this difficult time.”

Kempe, a mother of two, was last seen around 10:30 p.m. on July 9 as she departed The Molina’s Cantina restaurant in the 6300 block of FM 1463 in Katy, Texas. Kempe was thought to be returning to her Richmond area home near FM 359 and FM 723, but her whereabouts were unknown, according to the Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office.

Tim Miller, the founder of Texas Equusearch, said relatives told him Kempe called friends after leaving the restaurant and told them she was in the water.

Investigators with the Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office said the area is known for high water during heavy rains.

“Usually, whenever it floods, the water rises pretty high and then whenever the sun or it stops raining it will go down,” said Lt. Simons.


About the Authors:

Briana Zamora-Nipper joined the KPRC 2 digital team as a community associate producer in 2019. During her time in H-Town, she's covered everything from fancy Houston homes to tropical storms. Previously, she worked at Austin Monthly Magazine and KAGS TV, where she earned a Regional Edward R. Murrow award for her work as a digital producer.

Emmy Award-winning journalist, wife, mom, bonus mom, undercover break dancer.