Houston Newsmakers: Texas Dems stymie GOP voting bill…for now

Hits and misses this legislative session

Controversial Voter Integrity Law
Controversial Voter Integrity Law (KPRC-Pixabay)
Texas has some of the strictest voter laws in the country, something GOP legislators wanted to toughen even more in the closing days of the legislative session. A walkout by Democrats on the final day prevented it from happening when Republicans were left without a quorum.
Texas has some of the strictest voter laws in the country, something GOP legislators wanted to toughen even more in the closing days of the legislative session. A walkout by Democrats on the final day prevented it from happening when Republicans were left without a quorum.

Texas has some of the strictest voter laws in the country, something GOP legislators wanted to toughen even more in the closing days of the legislative session. A walkout by Democrats on the final day prevented it from happening when Republicans were left without a quorum. BUT Governor Abbott has said he will call a special session to eventually push the new regulations through. “This is definitely a case where the Texas democrats simply don’t have the fire power,” said UH political science professor Brandon Rottinghaus, Ph.D.. “They may have won a battle on the ground but they need air coverage from Democrats in Washington to be able to win this battle.” Dr. Mark Jones, Political Science Fellow at the Baker Institute for Public Policy agrees the bill will ultimately pass but likely with changes. “Taking out the more objectionable parts of it such as limiting or starting early voting on Sunday’s at 1pm instead of earlier in the morning and some of the robust powers of poll watchers.”

Also discussed:

The Texas Heartbeat Bill to prevent abortions after six weeks of pregnancy

Constitutional Carry allowing open carrying of firearms for most non felons over the age of 21

And more of the hits and misses of this year’s session.

Congressman Al Green: End The Filibuster to Push Democrat Agenda

The filibuster rule in the U.S. Senate requires 60 Senators to vote in favor of moving any legislation forward for discussion and vote. Without those 60 votes, bills passed by the Democrat dominated House can’t even make it to the Senate floor for a vote. Congressman Al Green, (D) 9th says that’s something he hopes will change. “I am for eliminating the filibuster, especially as it relates to civil rights legislation and these things that we have to do,” he said. “It makes no sense for us to do nothing because we can’t get 60 people to agree so we can pass something with 51 votes.” For more with Congressman Green on a January 6th Commission, the Harris County snub for Hurricane Harvey related flood mitigation projects and more.

Watch Newsmakers EXTRA with Congressman Green

More Information:

U.S. Rep. Al Green Weber, (D), 9th Congressional District

· Website: https://algreen.house.gov/

· Twitter: @RepAlGreen

Mark Jones, Ph.D., Political Science Fellow, Baker Institute for Public Policy, Rice University

· Website: https://www.bakerinstitute.org/experts/mark-p-jones/

· Twitter: @MarkPJonesTX

· Twitter: @RiceUniversity

Brandon Rottinghaus, Ph.D. Political Science Professor, University of Houston

· Website: https://www.uh.edu/class/political-science/faculty-and-staff/professors/rottinghaus/

· Twitter: @Bjrottinghaus

· Twitter: @UHouston


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