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5 facts you probably didn’t know about Prada Marfa; the fake boutique turned viral Texas attraction

MARFA, TX - DECEMBER 27:  Prada Marfa which is a permanently installed sculpture by artists Elmgreen and Dragset to resemble a Prada store is seen on December 27, 2012 in Marfa, Texas. Situated in West Texas, this town of just over 2000 residents has become a popular tourist destination.  (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
MARFA, TX - DECEMBER 27: Prada Marfa which is a permanently installed sculpture by artists Elmgreen and Dragset to resemble a Prada store is seen on December 27, 2012 in Marfa, Texas. Situated in West Texas, this town of just over 2000 residents has become a popular tourist destination. (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images) (2013 Getty Images)

HOUSTON – Located far west in the middle of a Texas desert sits Prada Marfa, an art installation designed to mimic a luxury boutique that has become an online sensation and road trip attraction.

Over time the stranded boutique has become an art mecca, attracting thousands of visitors every year.

The exhibit created by artists Elmgreen and Dragset in 2005.

Miuccia Prada consulted on the project, allowing the artist to use the Prada name and trademark.

Here are 5 facts you probably didn’t know about Prada Marfa:

  1. At the time of Prada Marfa’s grand opening, there were no actual Prada stores in the entire state of Texas, according to all things interesting.
  2. The exhibit is built of a biodegradable adobe-like substance that is meant to slowly melt back into the Earth, serving as a surrealist commentary on Western materialism, according to Atlas Obscura.
  3. Miuccia Prada handpicked merchandise for the exhibit’s interior. The cost of the products totaled to $80,000, according to Atlas Obscura.
  4. The night after the exhibit was installed, it was looted. Vandals broke windows, stole the designer items, and graffitied the walls, according to Atlas Obscura.
  5. After being vandalized, Prada Marfa was repaired and extra precautions were taken to prevent another looting. All handbags on display have no bottoms and all of the shoes are only right-footed, according to Atlas Obscura.

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