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‘Color Field’ sculptures coming to UH-Main campus this October

Odili Donald Odita (b. 1966) "Negative Space," 2019. Series of thirteen flags on flagpoles. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York
Odili Donald Odita (b. 1966) "Negative Space," 2019. Series of thirteen flags on flagpoles. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York (© Ironside Photography)

HOUSTON – A splash of color will make its way to University of Houston this October.

“Color Field,” which consists of bright-colored, large sculptures will make its debut at UH-Main Campus in October. This is the first curated exhibition and the second project in the university system’s Temporary Public Art program, in partnership with Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, according to the university in a release.

‘Color Field’ will introduce and create accessible connections to color theory, providing opportunities for guests to interact with objects as they think about the impact of color on our lives,” said Allison Glenn, curator at Crystal Brudges Museum of American Art in a statement.

The exhibition will be free and will be displayed at Wilhelmina’s Grove, across Cullen Boulevard through UH’s art district and surrounding the Ezekiel W. Cullen Building. The art will also be displayed at Butler Plaza and Lynn Eusan Park on University Drive.

Generously supported by the Brown Foundation, the display will be in view starting October 2020 through May 2021.

See a preview of “Color Field” below. To learn more, click here.

TYPOE (b. 1983). "Forms from Life", 2017. Painted aluminum. Dimensions vary. Courtesy of the artist. Installation view, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, 2019.
TYPOE (b. 1983). "Forms from Life", 2017. Painted aluminum. Dimensions vary. Courtesy of the artist. Installation view, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, 2019. (© Ironside Photography)
“Here” (2019) by Sarah Braman is a concrete drainage pipe powder-coated with aluminum frames that allows light from the sun to project through its circular, colored glass windows.
“Here” (2019) by Sarah Braman is a concrete drainage pipe powder-coated with aluminum frames that allows light from the sun to project through its circular, colored glass windows. (© Ironside Photography)
Spencer Finch (b. 1962). "Back to Kansas", 2015. Exterior household paint on canvas. 190 × 186 inches. Collection of Christian Keesee, New York and Oklahoma
Spencer Finch (b. 1962). "Back to Kansas", 2015. Exterior household paint on canvas. 190 × 186 inches. Collection of Christian Keesee, New York and Oklahoma (© Ironside Photography)

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