74ºF

KPRC 2 Summer Kids Program: Get ready to blast off into space for Week 5

Solar system
Solar system (pixabay)

KPRC 2 knows this summer is different than others, but it’s one your family will always remember. Let’s make it memorable for all the right reasons with the KPRC 2 Summer Kids Program.

We will have a weekly program on a different theme each week. Your family can take part throughout the summer in activities that we hope you will find fun, educational and memorable. Our program will include printable coloring pages, an activity, reading list and online scrapbooking opportunity.

Also -- we know not everyone will have the books listed on our reading lists, so we’re sharing our themes so you can get books on these topics: birds, cooking, weather, mammals, stars/space, health/physical education, dance/theater, and Texas history. Be sure to share your favorite books on these themes with us, as it’s always fun to get book suggestions from friends.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Get read to see the stars: Welcome to Week 5 of our Summer Kids Program

Stars and space is the fifth theme in the KPRC 2 Kids Summer Program. With the universe being so big, learn about some of the things within it.

Travel through space with us and see what’s in the solar system we live in.

Coloring page

We’re going to kick start the week with a coloring activity. Get ready to explore some faraway places with these NASA coloring pages.

You can design your very own solar system. There are lots of planets to choose from, so color away.

Activity

Every time should be activity time, and this week is no exception. Put your face on the world, or better yet the world on your face. These planets masks will bring a new aspect of fun to your space journey.

STEM activities can have a thrill to them too. NASA STEM has a multitude of fun things you can get into. Play, solve and build your way into the galaxy.

Pro tips: Measure the mask straps around your head for a customized fit.

Reading list

“Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth” by Oliver Jeffers - Oliver Jeffers offers a personal look inside his own hopes and wishes for his child--a missive about our world and those who call it home.

”I Am Neil Armstrong” by Brad Meltzer - This friendly, fun biography series focuses on the traits that made our heroes great--the traits that kids can aspire to in order to live heroically themselves. Each book tells the story of one of America’s icons in a lively, conversational way that works well for the youngest nonfiction readers and that always includes the hero’s childhood influences. At the back are an excellent timeline and photos. This volume tells the story of Neil Armstrong, the first person to walk on the moon.

“Looking Up!: The Science of Stargazing” by Joe Rao - Did you know that comets are sometimes called “hairy stars?” Or that if you saw a sunset on the moon, the sun would look white because the moon doesn’t have an atmosphere? You’ll learn this and much more as you become an expert on the objects in the sky.

“The Darkest Dark” by Chris Hadfield - Chris loves rockets and planets and pretending he’s a brave astronaut, exploring the universe. Only one problem--at night, Chris doesn’t feel so brave. He’s afraid of the dark. But when he watches the groundbreaking moon landing on TV, he realizes that space is the darkest dark there is--and the dark is beautiful and exciting, especially when you have big dreams to keep you company.

“Look Inside Space” by Rob Lloyd Jones - This is a great fun flap book packed with interesting information about space, and the amazing things that float through it - stars, moons, comets, and the planets of our solar system. Each double-page spread has a stunning colour illustration, and several flaps to lift to find out more about what’s going on in the scene - such as what goes inside the International Space Station, how astronauts visited the Moon and what they did there, as well as the history of astronomy, from Galileo to the Hubble Space Telescope.

“Little Kids’ First Big Book of Space” by Catherine Hughes and David Aguilar - This beautiful book is the latest addition to the National Geographic Little Kids First Big Book series. These colorful pages will introduce young children to the wonders of space, with colorful illustrations by David Aguilar and simple text that is perfect for beginning readers or for reading aloud. The book will explain basic concepts of space, beginning with what is most familiar to kids and expanding out into the universe.

“Space Mice” by Lori Haskins Houran - When two hungry mice spot a giant yellow ball of cheese in the night sky, they get right to work building a rocketship so they can take a big bite out of that glowing full moon. After sailing through starry skies, the mice arrive at the feast of their dreams—and soon the moon isn’t so full anymore! Simple, rhythmic text makes this a great read-aloud for future astronauts.

“Mousetronaut: Based on a (Partially) True Story” by Mark Kelly - Astronaut Mark Kelly flew with “mice-tronauts” on his first spaceflight aboard space shuttle Endeavour in 2001. Mousetronaut tells the story of a small mouse that wants nothing more than to travel to outer space. The little mouse works as hard as the bigger mice to show readiness for the mission . . . and is chosen for the flight! While in space, the astronauts are busy with their mission when disaster strikes—and only the smallest member of the crew can save the day. With lively illustrations by award-winning artist C. F. Payne, Mousetronaut is a charming tale of perseverance, courage, and the importance of the small!

“Chicken in Space” by Adam Lehrhaupt - Zoey isn’t like the other chickens. She has dreams. She has plans. And she has a best friend, Sam the pig, who will join her on her wild adventures . . . if he gets to eat some pie along the way.

“A Place for Pluto” by Stef Wade - Pluto got the shock of his life when he was kicked out of the famous nine. His planet status was stripped away, leaving him lost and confused. Poor Pluto! On his quest to find a place where he belongs, he talks to comets, asteroids, and meteoroids. He doesn’t fit it anywhere! But when Pluto is about to give up, he runs into a dwarf planet and finally finds his place in the solar system. This feel-good board book combines a popular science topic with character education themes of self discovery, acceptance, and friendship.

“Ralph and the Rocket Ship” by Alyssa Satin Capucilli - All Ralph wants is a rocket ship. So he asks his mom for one. “Too big,” she tells him. Ralph asks his dad. “Too tall,” he tells Ralph. What will Ralph do? With a little bit of imagination, a stack! stack!, a bang! bang!, and a tape, tape, tape, tape!, Ralph soon has his rocket ship. And it’s even big enough to fit his good pal Katy Duck, too!

“You Should Meet: Katherine Johnson” by Thea Feldman - Meet Katherine Johnson, a brilliant mathematician who worked at NASA in the early 1950s until retiring in 1986. Katherine’s unparalleled calculations (done by hand) helped plan the trajectories for NASA’s Mercury and Apollo missions (including the Apollo 11 moon landing). She is said to be one of the greatest American minds of all time.

“Mad Scientist Academy: The Space Disaster” by Matthew McElligott - When Dr. Cosmic’s class meets Commander Nova, the school astronomer, they know their next lesson will be out of this world! With the help of Dr. Cosmic’s latest invention—a planetarium—the class must complete four challenges. Each time the planetarium shifts and the atmosphere changes, the students find themselves floating from planet to planet. They put their new magnetic antigravity belts and trusted handbooks to the test to figure out where in the solar system Dr. Cosmic’s invention has “sent” them—and how to land safely back on Earth.

“Galaxy Zack: Hello, Nebulon! by Ray O’Ryan - n Hello, Nebulon!, Zack makes the big move from Earth. He is already nervous about starting school and making new friends, but it only gets worse when he dreams that his classmates are slimy aliens with tentacles, pizza comes covered in gross bugs, and he can never communicate with his Earth friends again! Fortunately, when Zack arrives at Sprockets Academy for his first day of school, he meets and befriends Drake Tucker, a Nebulite boy who also loves to explore and learn about the planets. Nebulon isn’t as awful as Zack’s dream, but there are a lot of differences between Nebulon and Earth, and they make Zack miss his home in Dubbsville, Texas, even more. But things start to look up when he receives a mysterious surprise. What could it possibly be?

A Place in Space” by Joan Sweeny - Where is the earth? Where is the sun? Where are the stars? Now with new art by Christine Gore, here is an out-of-this world introduction to the universe for children. With Earth as a starting point, a young astronaut leads readers on a tour past each planet and on to the stars, answering simple questions about our solar system. In clear language, drawings, and diagrams, space unfolds before a child’s eyes. Colorful illustrations, filled with fun detail, give children a lot to look for on every page, and a glossary helps reinforce new words and concepts. A terrific teaching tool, Me and My Place in Space is an easy and enjoyable way to introduce the concept of space to budding astronomers.

“Stars and Galaxies by James Buckley Jr. - Featuring stunning photos of stars, galaxies, constellations, and more, DK Reader Stars and Galaxies is packed with fascinating facts about space and stargazing for kids just beginning to read fluently with support. DK’s innovative range of levelled readers combines a highly visual approach with non-fiction narratives that children will love reading. DK Reader Stars and Galaxies is a level 2 reader, Beginning to Read, offering a delightful narrative for young children to encourage an interest in and desire to read. Simple sentences are used with an emphasis on frequently used words with strong visual clues and labels introducing and reinforcing vocabulary.

JOIN OUR ONLINE SCRAPBOOK

Share your photos and videos in the widget below throughout the week as you color, complete activities and read. We’ll share them throughout the week on KPRC 2 and at the end of the summer program.