Wrongful death lawsuit filed over Naya Rivera's drowning

FILE - In this Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, file photo, Naya Rivera participates in the "Step Up: High Water," panel during the YouTube Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena, Calif. A wrongful death lawsuit was filed Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, over the death of Glee actor Rivera, who drowned over the summer while boating with her 4-year-old son on a California lake. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP, File)
FILE - In this Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, file photo, Naya Rivera participates in the "Step Up: High Water," panel during the YouTube Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena, Calif. A wrongful death lawsuit was filed Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, over the death of Glee actor Rivera, who drowned over the summer while boating with her 4-year-old son on a California lake. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP, File) (2018 Invision)

VENTURA, Calif. – A wrongful death lawsuit has been filed over the drowning of “Glee” actor Naya Rivera, who died this summer while boating with her 4-year-old son on a California lake.

The suit, filed Tuesday, blames Ventura County and managers of Lake Piru for her accidental death on July 8 at the lake northwest of Los Angeles. It was filed on behalf of her son, Josey Hollis Dorsey, by Ryan Dorsey — Rivera's ex-husband and the boy's father and guardian — and also on behalf of her estate.

Rivera, 33, had rented a pontoon boat on the lake. Her son was found sleeping and alone on the drifting boat later that afternoon.

Rivera's body was found floating in a 30-foot-deep area of the lake five days later. The Ventura County Sheriff’s Office said Rivera's body was most likely trapped in thick vegetation underwater for several days before floating to the top.

An autopsy report said Rivera was a good swimmer and listed her death as an accident.

But the lawsuit said negligence was involved. It said the pontoon boat lacked a safely accessible ladder, radio, rope, anchor or other equipment to keep swimmers from being separated from the boat.

It also didn't have a life preserver or other flotation or lifesaving devices, according to the suit.

The man who rented Rivera the boat has said she declined a life vest, but he put one aboard anyway.