Lamoureux twins retire after 14 years with USA Hockey

FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2013, file photo, United States Olympic Winter Games hockey players Jocelyne Lamoureux, left, and Monique Lamoureux pose for a portrait at the Team USA Media Summit in Park City, Utah. USA Hockeys twin-sister Lamoureux tandem is retiring after 14 years of international competition. Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson and Monique Lamoureux-Morando made the joint announcement in an article published on The Players Tribune on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021.  (AP Photo/Carlo Allegri, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2013, file photo, United States Olympic Winter Games hockey players Jocelyne Lamoureux, left, and Monique Lamoureux pose for a portrait at the Team USA Media Summit in Park City, Utah. USA Hockeys twin-sister Lamoureux tandem is retiring after 14 years of international competition. Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson and Monique Lamoureux-Morando made the joint announcement in an article published on The Players Tribune on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021. (AP Photo/Carlo Allegri, File)

Though they didn’t know it at the time three years ago, USA Hockey’s Lamoureux twin sisters played a major role in perfectly scripting their retirement on Tuesday.

Had it not been for their clutch contributions in the United States’ 3-2 shootout victory over Canada in the gold-medal game at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson and Monique Lamoureux-Morando might have been back on the ice practicing rather than announcing an end to their illustrious 14-year international careers.

“My husband asked me that question two weeks ago,” Lamoureux-Davidson said, as to whether the decision to retire would have been harder had the U.S. lost.

“My initial reaction was, ‘Yeah, we would be able to.’ And then I really thought about it, and I think it would’ve been much more difficult,” she added. “We’ve been chasing a dream for so long, so had we not won, who knows.”

The question became moot thanks in large part to the Lamoureux sisters, who leave the sport on a high note.

Lamoureux-Morando scored the tying goal with less than seven minutes remaining, and Lamoureux-Davidson scored the decisive shootout goal, leading the U.S. to its second Olympic title and first since the 1998 Nagano Games.

“We didn’t know that was going to be our last international tournament, and to cap it off with an Olympic gold medal. But I think it’s almost fitting,” Lamoureux-Morando said. “It’s definitely not an easy decision to come to, but one that’s right for us and at the right time.”

They were members of U.S. teams that won six world championships and Olympic silver at the 2010 Vancouver and ’14 Sochi Games.