Coronavirus testing in Texas plummets as schools prepare to reopen

Medical workers wearing personal protective equipment test for COVID-19 at a testing site at Memorial Park Aquatic Facility in El Paso on July, 16, 2020. In recent weeks, the average number of tests administered in Texas has fallen by more than 40%.                    Credit: Joel Angel Juarez for The Texas
Medical workers wearing personal protective equipment test for COVID-19 at a testing site at Memorial Park Aquatic Facility in El Paso on July, 16, 2020. In recent weeks, the average number of tests administered in Texas has fallen by more than 40%. Credit: Joel Angel Juarez for The Texas

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The number of Texans being tested for the coronavirus has fallen sharply in recent weeks, a trend that has worried public health experts as officials consider sending children back to school while thousands more Texans are infected each day.

In the week ending Aug. 8, an average 36,255 coronavirus tests were administered in Texas each day — a drop of about 42% from two weeks earlier, when the average number of daily tests was 62,516.

At the same time, the percentage of tests yielding positive results has climbed, up to 20% on average in the week ending Aug. 8. Two weeks earlier, the average positivity rate was around 14%.

On Saturday, the state set a record for its positivity rate, with more than half of that day’s roughly 14,000 viral tests indicating an infection.

Taken together, the low number of tests and the large percentage of positive results suggest inadequacies in the state's public health surveillance effort at a time when school reopenings are certain to increase viral spread, health experts said.

"Opening the schools is a really complicated problem, and the best thing we can do is get the number of cases down so kids can go back to school safely," said Catherine Troisi, an infectious disease epidemiologist at UTHealth School of Public Health in Houston. "There are so many reasons why kids need to be in school, particularly younger kids, but we’re finding out more and more they can get infected, and the concern is them bringing it home and spreading in the community and spreading to teachers.

"I think the worst thing would be for schools to open, then close," she said. "That really makes it hard on parents, that unpredictability, and there’s a lot of costs associated with opening the schools safely."