Wisconsin issues recount order in 2 counties as Trump wanted

FILE - In this Nov. 3, 2020 file photo, workers count Milwaukee County ballots on Election Day at Central Count in Milwaukee. President Donald Trump's campaign has paid $3 million for a recount of two heavily Democratic Wisconsin counties, saying Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, that they were the site of the "worst irregularities" although no evidence of wrongdoing has been presented and state elections officials have said there was none. (AP Photo/Morry Gash File)
FILE - In this Nov. 3, 2020 file photo, workers count Milwaukee County ballots on Election Day at Central Count in Milwaukee. President Donald Trump's campaign has paid $3 million for a recount of two heavily Democratic Wisconsin counties, saying Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, that they were the site of the "worst irregularities" although no evidence of wrongdoing has been presented and state elections officials have said there was none. (AP Photo/Morry Gash File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

MADISON, Wis. – The Wisconsin Elections Commission issued an order Thursday to recount more than 800,000 ballots cast in two heavily liberal counties at President Donald Trump's request.

The order, required by law after Trump paid $3 million for the recount, was agreed to after rancorous debate for more than five hours Wednesday night that foreshadows the partisan battle ahead.

“It’s just remarkable the six of us in a civilized fashion can’t agree to this stuff,” Democratic commissioner Mark Thomsen said hours into the debate. The commission is split 3-3 between Democrats and Republicans.

The recounts in Milwaukee and Dane counties, where Joe Biden outpolled Trump by a more than 2-to-1 margin, will begin Friday and must be completed by Dec. 1. Milwaukee County officials said they plan to finish the recount by Wednesday. Dane County Clerk Scott McDonell said “it would be great to be done by Thanksgiving,” but he didn't have an estimate for when the work would conclude.

Biden won statewide by 20,608 votes. Trump’s campaign has cited “irregularities” in the counties, although no evidence of illegal activity has been presented.

“We understand the eyes of the world will be on these Wisconsin counties over the next few weeks,” Meagan Wolfe, Wisconsin's top elections official, said Thursday. “We look forward to again demonstrating the strength, security, integrity and transparency of our election systems in Wisconsin.”

The commission argued over changes to its manual that provides guidance to local elections officials over how to conduct recounts. Ultimately, they decided not to reference the manual in the order, but they did update some parts to reflect accommodations for the coronavirus pandemic.

The commissioners deadlocked on making changes to the manual that Democrats and elections commission staff said would bring the guidance into line with current state law. Republicans balked, saying the guidelines should not be changed after Trump filed for the recount.