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A Houston sommelier has these tips to help you impress your wine friends

Tips to keep in mind while shopping for wine and much more

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HOUSTON
Sommelier Joshua Theis with Radio Milano left his Certified Nursing Assistant expertise to purse his passion in wine. He's been a wine steward, educator and dining room manager at Season's 52, Pappadeaux and Carraba's. Theis joined Radio Milano in 2014 and became a certified sommelier in 2015.

Q: What do you look for in wine while shopping?
A: I usually prefer lighter styles of wine, usually high in acid, such as French/Oregon Pinot Noir, Italian Sangiovese, dry German Riesling, or Sauvignon Blanc (New Zealand or Mediterranean)

Q: What do you look for in wine while eating? 
A: Depends on what I’m eating, but I don’t believe you’re stuck with the “normal” pairings (fish with white, heavy meats with red). I like to change it up as long as the weight of the food and wine match each other (both for myself and my guests on my tasting menu). Try salmon with Sauternes or a chianti; pizza with Chardonnay; crawfish with sauvignon blanc or pinot noir.

Q: What do you look for in wine during summer?
A: Something really crisp and fresh, especially if I’m outside in the sun. I don’t want something that will hang around on my palate and make an already hot day hotter due to dry tannins in my mouth. 

Q: What do you think of seasonal drinking (red-winter/white-summer)?
A: Another tradition that’s stuck around that’s outdated for our current wine scene (in my opinion, it was never an “in-date” thing)

Q: What constitutes your wine list?
A: Radio Milano is an Italian restaurant, so there’s definitely a strong emphasis on Italian wines and representation of Italy’s various regions. But, there is definitely a global representation due to being located in a hotel and in a general area that sees many overseas guests and families.

Q: What is the vision for your wine list?
A: Providing an example to people of regions and grapes that are frequently passed over. Everybody immediately gravitates to what they know and there’s nothing wrong with that at all, but I was always taught to branch out and try all things. We all are. If we didn’t, we would still be eating whatever we ate when we were two years old. 

To connect with Joshua, click here


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