AP Explains: Kashmir on edge 1 year after major Indian shift

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FILE - In this Aug. 9, 2019, file photo, an Indian national flag, left, is hoisted next to a Jammu and Kashmir state flag on the government secretariat building after New Delhi scrapped the disputed regions semi-autonomy in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir. Indian-controlled Kashmir has remained on edge after New Delhi last summer scrapped the disputed regions semi-autonomy amid a near-total clampdown. While deeply unpopular in Muslim-majority Kashmir, the sudden move resonated in India, where Prime Minister Narendra Modi was cheered by supporters for fulfilling a long-held Hindu nationalist pledge. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File)

SRINAGAR – Indian-controlled Kashmir has remained on edge in the year since New Delhi scrapped the disputed region’s semi-autonomy and imposed a near-total clampdown.

While deeply unpopular in Muslim-majority Kashmir, the sudden move last August resonated in much of India, where Prime Minister Narendra Modi was cheered by supporters for fulfilling a long-held Hindu nationalist pledge to scrap the restive region's special privileges and assimilate Kashmir into the rest of the country.

Since then, the Indian government has imposed overarching restrictions, ranging from curfews to communication blackouts, and enacted new laws that have created a climate of fear.

Here is an overview:

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WHAT HAPPENED

On Aug. 5, 2019, the Modi government passed legislation in Parliament that stripped Jammu and Kashmir's statehood, scrapped its separate constitution and removed inherited protections on land and jobs.

The region was also split into two federal territories — Ladakh and Jammu-Kashmir. To forestall any public revolt, the region was flooded with soldiers manning roadblocks of razor wire. Phone lines and internet connections were switched off and residents were under a 24-hour curfew for several weeks, and then an intermittent lockdown for months.