EXPLAINER: A look at Trump's long-shot legal challenges

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Former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani, a lawyer for President Donald Trump, speaks during a news conference on legal challenges to vote counting in Pennsylvania, Saturday Nov. 7, 2020, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

As President Donald Trump continues to push falsehoods about the election, his legal team has so far failed to gain any traction in court without evidence of widespread fraud, which experts widely agree doesn’t exist.

Despite that, Trump and his Republican allies are pressing forward with several cases aimed at blocking or delaying the certification of election results in key battleground states won by President-elect Joe Biden. Republicans are complaining that, among other things, their observers weren’t allowed to properly review the processing of ballots.

Experts say Trump has almost no chance of reversing the election. But his repeated baseless claims that the race was rigged is undermining public confidence in the election system while instilling in his supporters the idea that Biden will be an illegitimate president.

Here’s a look at where Republican election challenges stand in six states:

ARIZONA

THE CASE: The Arizona Republican Party is trying to block the certification of the election results in the state’s most populous county, Maricopa, until the court rules on the party’s lawsuit asking for a new hand count of a sampling of ballots. An audit already completed by the county found no discrepancies, officials said.

WHAT HAPPENED: The judge has not issued a decision. A hearing in the case is scheduled for Wednesday.

In a separate case, Trump’s campaign and the Republican National Committee had sought to delay the certification of election results in Maricopa County. Republicans asked for the manual inspection of ballots in metro Phoenix, alleging that some votes were improperly rejected. A judge dismissed the case on Nov. 13 after the campaign’s lawyers acknowledged the small number of ballots at issue wouldn’t change the outcome of how Arizona voted for president.