Hundreds of invasive fish removed from Texas waterway: This is what state wildlife authorities want you to know

Invasive suckermouth armored catfish collected from a Texas waterway. (Texas Rivers & Streams - Texas Parks and Wildlife/Facebook, Texas Rivers & Streams - Texas Parks and Wildlife/Facebook)

HOUSTON – Researchers from Texas A&M and Texas State universities removed more than 400 invasive suckermouth armored catfish from the San Marcos River in Texas.

During the dewatering event at Rio Vista Park, 406 of the fish -- known as plecos or SAC -- were removed.

“Information collected from these fish will help managers to better understand how to effectively control this invasive species,” state wildlife officials said in the Texas Rivers & Streams - Texas Parks and Wildlife Facebook post. “SAC have been introduced to numerous water bodies in Texas through aquarium dumping.”

Researchers from Texas A&M and Texas State universities recently removed a total of 406 invasive suckermouth armored...

Posted by Texas Rivers & Streams - Texas Parks and Wildlife on Thursday, January 13, 2022

Authorities reminded people to never dump their aquarium fish.

“Dumping anything out of an aquarium — fish, animals, and plants — can have devastating consequences for Texas’ natural waterbodies,” according to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department website on invasives. “This is true for both freshwater and saltwater aquariums. Never dump them into a natural body of water or flush them down the toilet.”

Authorities are also searching for invasive snails called the Giant Appesnail, particularly in the Houston area. If you have seen them, report them to Texas Parks and Wildlife authorities.


About the Author:

Amanda Cochran is an Edward R. Murrow award-winning journalist. She specializes in Texas features, consumer and business news and local crime coverage.