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MAP: 73 hate groups operate in Texas, 14 in Houston, according to non-profit group

The Southern Poverty Law Center lists 73 active hate groups operating in Texas in 2018. (Image from SPLC website) (SPLC)

HOUSTON – There were 73 hate groups operating in Texas, including 14 with roots or chapters in Houston in 2018, according to data from the Southern Poverty Law Center.

In 2000, the non-profit organization listed 38 hate groups in the state, which rose to 73 groups last year, with some fluctuations over the years. SPLC says they tracked more than 1,000 hate groups around the country in 2018. You can see the full map here.

The Houston groups named by SPLC are:

Houston groupClassification
A Voice For MenMale supremacy
Act for AmericaAnti-muslim
Black Riders Liberation PartyBlack Nationalist
Conservative Republicans of TexasAnti-LGBT
Great MilestoneBlack Nationalist
Israel United In ChristBlack Nationalist
Israelite School of Universal Practical KnowledgeBlack Nationalist
Mountains of IsraelBlack Nationalist
Nation of IslamBlack Nationalist
New Black Panther PartyBlack Nationalist
New Black Panther Party for Self DefenseBlack Nationalist
Proud BoysGeneral hate
Texans for Immigration Reduction and EnforcementAnti-immigrant
The Right StuffWhite Nationalist

READ ALSO: Hate crimes in Houston rose by 212% in 2018, according to new FBI crime data

SPLC says there were also 14 groups that operate statewide in 2018. Those groups are:

Statewide groupClassification
Asatru Folk AssemblyGeneral hate
Atomwaffen DivisionNeo-Nazi
The Daily StormerNeo-Nazi
Gallows Tree Wotansvolk AllianceGeneral hate
Identity DixieNeo-Confederate
Identity EvropaWhite Nationalist
Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux KlanKKK
Midland HammerskinsRacist Skinhead (White Supremacist)
National, Socialist LegionNeo-Nazi
Patriot FrontWhite Nationalist
Soldiers of OdinAnti-Muslim
Traditionalist Worker PartyNeo-Nazi
Vanguard AmericaNeo-Nazi
Vinlanders Social ClubRacist Skinhead (White Supremacist)

On its website, the SPLC says it is “dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry and to seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of our society.”

The method by which SPLC labels groups as “hate groups,” has been a subject of controversy in the past with critics claiming the non-profit organization chooses its causes with funding and donations in mind. Critics have also said the SPLC’s definition of hate is too broad but the group has always stood behind its data.

Over the years, SPLC has been the target of multiple lawsuits. The non-profit organization apologized and agreed to pay $3.4 million to a British group and its founder after labeling them anti-Muslim extremists.

The founder of one of the groups with Houston ties, Proud Boys, filed a defamation lawsuit against SPLC in February, according to a report by NBC News.


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