5 tips for acing a virtual job interview

Job interviews are nerve-wracking enough, but now that so many companies are working remotely they're happening on a computer screen. That brings additional layers of unease -- tech issues, unexpected cameos from family members and the awkwardness of figuring out whose turn it is to speak.
Job interviews are nerve-wracking enough, but now that so many companies are working remotely they're happening on a computer screen. That brings additional layers of unease -- tech issues, unexpected cameos from family members and the awkwardness of figuring out whose turn it is to speak. (Max Pepper/CNN)

Job interviews are nerve-wracking enough, but now that so many companies are working remotely they're happening on a computer screen. That brings additional layers of unease -- tech issues, unexpected cameos from family members and the awkwardness of figuring out whose turn it is to speak.

But that's our reality for the time being.

While home might be a more comfortable setting, it can also be harder to establish a rapport: there's no handshake, no light banter as you walk to the interview room and social cues are harder to pick up on.

The good news is that the preparation for a video interview remains largely the same: research the company, the industry and any competitors. Come up with thoughtful questions that will give you practical insight about the position and the company's culture. Troubleshoot your tech and audio setup before the interview starts, and always follow up with a personalized thank you note.

But there are some specific tips that apply to acing a video interview:

Be camera-ready immediately

You have about one-tenth of a second to make a first impression, according to Ian Siegel, co-founder and CEO at ZipRecruiter.

Use it wisely.