‘America’s Tall Ship,’ Coast Guard Cutter Eagle makes first ever visit in Galveston

Coast Guard Cutter Eagle sails in Long Island Sound, July 30, 2020. The Eagle has served as a classroom at sea to future Coast Guard officers since 1946, offering an at-sea leadership and professional development experience. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Thieme) (Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Thieme)

GALVESTON, Texas – The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle, “America’s Tall Ship,” is scheduled to appear in Galveston, Texas, for the first time ever on June 10.

After leading a Parade of Sail comprising Coast Guard and port partner vessels, Eagle will moor at Pier 21 in Galveston and will be open for free public tours June 10-13.

Friday, June 10:

Noon – 4 p.m. Public Tours

Saturday, June 11:

10 a.m. – 11 a.m. Military/First Responder Tours (with valid ID)

11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Public Tours

Sunday, June 12:

10 a.m. – 11 a.m. Military/First Responder Tours (with valid ID)

11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Public Tours

Eagle is 295 feet long, is the largest tall ship flying the American flag, and is the only active square-rigger in United States government service, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

Eagle has served as a “classroom at sea” to future Coast Guard officers since 1946. It offers an at-sea leadership and professional development experience as part of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy curriculum.

Eagle is a three-masted barque with over 22,300 square feet of sail and 6 miles of rigging. It was originally commissioned as the Horst Wessel by the German navy and was a war reparation for the United States following World War II, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

Additional information about the Eagle can be found here. The Eagle’s design dimensions can be found here.


About the Author:

Briana Zamora-Nipper joined the KPRC 2 digital team in 2019. When she’s not hard at work in the KPRC 2 newsroom, you can find Bri drinking away her hard earned wages at JuiceLand, running around Hermann Park, listening to crime podcasts or ransacking the magazine stand at Barnes & Noble.