55ºF

Astros broadcaster Geoff Blum balances it all

HOUSTON – If you watch the Astros, you’re used to seeing and hearing broadcaster Geoff Blum call the game and interview players. But when he’s home, he has a completely different clubhouse of his own. 

Geoff Blum’s voice is synonymous with Astros baseball. When he’s not at a ballpark, he’s at Seven Lakes High School, watching his triplet daughters play volleyball. 

“When they’re on the court, man, watch out. They’ve got their own conversation going, they’ve got their own expectations, and they expect everybody to play the same way they do. That’s what’s a lot of fun,” Blum said. 

 

 

Audrey, Kayla and Ava all play on the freshman team at Seven Lakes. They say growing up as triplets were unique; a lot of stares from strangers, matching clothes and sharing a bedroom. And if you think triplets would be a handful, consider this; they have an older sister, Mia, a sophomore who plays on the varsity volleyball team. 

“Mia is more like Geoff. She’s definitely all business, and very smart,” said Kory, Geoff’s wife, adding that the triplets are sillier and more outgoing, like her.

The triplets’ story begins in what was a very memorable year for Houston fans; 2005, the year Blum hit his famous home run in Minute Maid Park against the Astros to win Game 3 of the World Series for the Chicago White Sox. 

“We’ve got a 15-month-old, and my wife says ‘I think I’m pregnant,’ and I thought, ‘OK, cool, we love family and we want another kid.’”

Initially, the doctor thought twins, which made sense with twins running on Kory’s side of the family. The doctor scheduled a follow-up appointment to make sure both twins stayed healthy. 

“Apparently there’s a phenomenon called the disappearing twin,” Blum said. “We went the other way. We went back and found out there were three heartbeats in there, and I looked at the doctor and said, ‘Hey man, we’re not coming back to do any more ultrasounds,’ so we got a good laugh at that.”

But for someone who grew up with all boys, it was overwhelming.

“I had a brother, grew up in a male-dominated sport and industry,” Blum said. “I had just gotten my feet wet with my first daughter.” 

It still can be overwhelming; especially at the dinner table, where the girls really show their personalities. 

“All of us girls just talk and talk, and he doesn’t know where to fit into the situation. It’s hilarious,” Mia said.

Although they all play volleyball and are athletic, the girls have distinct personalities. Kayla is neat and organized, Audrey is outgoing and social, and Ava is sweet; her siblings' joke that she’s the favorite. 

Geoff’s career has provided the girls with memories. The triplets remember rolling down Tal’s Hill at Minute Maid Park, and Mia recalls Geoff kissing his hand and pointing to her and Kory in the stands after his home run in that World Series game. 

“I get choked up all the time,” Geoff said. “But I’m just one of those proud dads. They’re great kids, and I can’t wait to see what they do.”