Millennial Money: How to move safely during a pandemic

FILE - In this March 18, 2020 file photo, students finish loading belongings into a U-Haul truck as they move out of their dorm in Washington.  Moving is stressful enough without throwing a pandemic into the mix.  If you are considering moving, be prepared for things to work a little differently and plan ahead to make it less of a hassle. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
FILE - In this March 18, 2020 file photo, students finish loading belongings into a U-Haul truck as they move out of their dorm in Washington. Moving is stressful enough without throwing a pandemic into the mix. If you are considering moving, be prepared for things to work a little differently and plan ahead to make it less of a hassle. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

Moving is stressful enough without throwing a pandemic into the mix.

Many Americans may be forced to consider moving as federal foreclosure and eviction moratoriums expire. In the first week of July, 32% of Americans did not make a full, on-time housing payment, according to a nationally representative survey by the website Apartment List. Others may relocate to save money, be closer to loved ones or simply leave a densely populated area.

If you’re considering moving, here’s what to know from a financial standpoint, as well as tips to make moving day safer.

BUDGET FOR EXTRAS

Aside from the usual expenses like buying boxes, renting a van or hiring movers, plan for extra costs because of the pandemic.

You may need to buy heavy-duty supplies to deep-clean your old place, for example, or to sanitize your new accommodations. If you are moving out of a rental unit, some landlords may ask you to pay for professional cleaners or take the cost out of your security deposit.

Moving across county or state lines? Check what the quarantine requirements are in your new location, says Jean Wilczynski, a certified financial planner and senior wealth advisor at Exencial Wealth Advisors in Old Lyme, Connecticut. You may have to pay for quarantine accommodations like a hotel or Airbnb if your new apartment or home is not move-in ready, she says.

If you are receiving unemployment benefits, check the rules on how your benefits carry forward in your new location and what the taxes are if it is a new state, Wilczynski says. You can typically find this information on your state’s Department of Labor website, she says.