Texans begin voting Monday in runoff elections. Officials are doing what they can to make it safe.

The Collin County Elections Department created a mock polling site to prepare poll workers for early voting beginning Monday. It included signs to inform voters and employees on how to reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19.      Shelby Tauber for The Texas Tribune
The Collin County Elections Department created a mock polling site to prepare poll workers for early voting beginning Monday. It included signs to inform voters and employees on how to reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19. Shelby Tauber for The Texas Tribune

The upheaval of the coronavirus pandemic will reshape one of the most fundamental aspects of ordinary life starting Monday: voting.

Poll workers will begin greeting voters from behind face masks and shields as early voting begins in primary runoffs that will look and operate differently from any Texas election in the past 100 years. Although the first statewide election during the pandemic is expected to be a low-turnout affair — primary runoffs usually see single-digit turnout — the contest is widely regarded as a high-stakes dry run for the November general election, when at least half of the state's more than 16 million registered voters are expected to participate.

More than 30 runoffs are ongoing for party nominations to congressional, legislative and local offices. The most prominent race is the statewide Democratic contest to see who will challenge incumbent John Cornyn for U.S. Senate.

But the shot at working through a new set of considerations — and challenges — for running a safe and efficient election could be complicated by its timing. The runoff was postponed from May and takes place as the state’s tenuous grip on controlling the coronavirus outbreak unravels into record-high daily infection and hospitalization rates.

“We're saying our prayers,” Jacque Callanen, the Bexar County elections administrator, said last week. “With this spike in the numbers, I’m praying our good ol’ election officials are going to hang in there with us.”

Like other administrators, Callanen worked to complete a census of the county’s regular fleet of election judges and workers, who tend to be older and at higher risk for complications from the coronavirus. She saw little drop-off, with most willing to work the election.

That was before the effects of Gov. Greg Abbott’s reopening of businesses and dismantling of local health restrictions were fully felt, and the county was reporting 30 or 50 new daily cases of people infected with the virus. In recent weeks, that number has skyrocketed to hundreds of new cases a day. If her prayers fail, Callanen has a set of backup county workers ready to step in.

Most Texas voters will be left unable to heed the governor’s recent warning to residents that the “safest place for you is at home.” The state successfully has fended off efforts to expand voting by mail during the pandemic. But voters will have more days to go to the polls in person after Abbott doubled what is usually a truncated early voting period for runoff elections.