Texans’ tales: stories of how people in the Lone Star State are confronting COVID-19

El Paso lawyer Taylor Levy leaves home before dawn each morning to cross the international bridge into Ciudad Juárez, where she helps migrants seeking asylum in the U.S.      Courtesy of Taylor Levy
El Paso lawyer Taylor Levy leaves home before dawn each morning to cross the international bridge into Ciudad Juárez, where she helps migrants seeking asylum in the U.S. Courtesy of Taylor Levy

Each week, The Texas Tribune is featuring the stories of a group of Texans from different parts of the state and different walks of life who are confronting the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. New installments will be published every Wednesday. You can read the entire collection here.

Moving home from Mexico: “It was starting to feel more dangerous”

Taylor Levy, 33, is an immigration lawyer in El Paso.

BY JULIÁN AGUILAR

EL PASO — Taylor Levy still shows up at the base of the Paso Del Norte bridge in Ciudad Juárez to assist asylum seekers or recently deported immigrants.

But now she approaches the bridge from the north instead of the south after the Juárez hotel where she’d been living closed earlier this month.

Levy, an immigration lawyer, had relocated to Juárez in March, just before the coronavirus paralyzed the United States, because she wanted to continue helping migrants in Mexico in case cross-border traffic was restricted because of the virus.

After she arrived in Juárez, she began noticing fewer people in the streets and more businesses closing temporarily because of the pandemic. The occupancy at her hotel began to shrink until she was the last guest there. One day on her way to the bridge, she walked within a block of a homicide scene, she said.