EXPLAINER: How are the Myanmar protests being organized?

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AP

A protester shouts as she flashes the three-fingered salute during a protest rally in Yangon, Myanmar, on Feb. 6, 2021. Protests in Myanmar against the military coup that removed Aung San Suu Kyis government from power have grown in recent days despite official efforts to make organizing them difficult or even illegal. (AP Photo)

Protests in Myanmar against the military coup that removed Aung San Suu Kyi's government from power have grown in recent days despite official efforts to make organizing them difficult or even illegal. Here's a look at who is organizing the protests and the obstacles they face:

IS PROTESTING ALLOWED?

It was a grey area for many days after the Feb. 1 coup, which also included the declaration of a state of emergency. But with the protests growing and spreading in recent days, the military on Monday issued decrees that effectively ban peaceful public protests in the country’s two biggest cities.

Rallies and gatherings of more than five people, along with motorized processions, are outlawed and an 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. curfew has been imposed for areas of Yangon and Mandalay, where thousands of people have been demonstrating since Saturday.

The restrictions have raised concerns about the potential for a violent crackdown.

WHO IS LEADING THE PROTESTS?

For the most part the protests have grown organically.

“This movement is leaderless — people are getting on the streets in their own way and at their own will,” said Thinzar Shunlei Yi, a prominent activist.