PG&E critics urge judge to reject utility's bankruptcy plan

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FILE - This Dec. 3, 2018, file photo, shows homes leveled by the Camp Fire line at the Ridgewood Mobile Home Park retirement community in Paradise, Calif. Pacific Gas & Electric's proposal to pay $25.5 billion for a series of deadly Northern California wildfires ignited by its equipment faces a last-ditch effort to persuade a judge to reject the plan to get the nation's largest utility out of bankruptcy. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)

SAN RAMON, Calif.

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Pacific Gas & Electric's proposal to pay $25.5 billion for a series of deadly Northern California wildfires ignited by its equipment faced a final barrage of resistance from critics Thursday, who told a federal judge that the plan will do more to enrich savvy investors than help fire victims rebuild their lives.

The impassioned arguments unfolded during the closing phase of a two-week trial that will determine whether the nation's largest utility can end its nearly year-and-half bankruptcy by a June 30 deadline. PG&E needs to close the case by that date to qualify for insurance coverage for future wildfires from a $21 billion fund created by the Legislature last year.

PG&E has cleared all the other key hurdles, but now needs U.S Bankruptcy Judge Dennis Montali to approve its complex plan for to settle more than $50 billion in claimed losses from deadly 2017 and 2018 wildfires at a deep discount.

PG&E critic's maintain the bankruptcy process was rigged in favor of Wall Street hedge funds and other investors who are poised to make billions of dollars off the case. By comparison, wildfire victims may not get all of the $13.5 billion promised to them while also having to continue to worry about the risks posed by a utility known for managerial neglect and a fraying electrical grid.