Feeling hopeless after a tough week? Here are 5 things that may help

People gather at a memorial mural painted outside the Cup Foods store on Chicago Avenue in South Minneapolis where George Floyd died at the hands of police, Friday, May 29, 2020 in Minneapolis. (Brian Peterson/Star Tribune via AP)
People gather at a memorial mural painted outside the Cup Foods store on Chicago Avenue in South Minneapolis where George Floyd died at the hands of police, Friday, May 29, 2020 in Minneapolis. (Brian Peterson/Star Tribune via AP) (2019 Brian Peterson/Star Tribune)

It's been an extraordinary week in America, as anger, pain and heartbreak have swept across the country over the killing of yet another black man at the hands of police.

The protests, unrest, outrage and fear have been impossible to ignore, and they come amid a pandemic that had already turned life upside down for many.

If you're feeling hopeless, you're not alone. CNN asked some experts for ways to get through it.

1. Acknowledge your feelings and put a label on them

"I think the most important thing is to acknowledge and sit with the idea that something is making us uncomfortable," said Alfiee Breland-Noble, psychologist and founder of mental health nonprofit, the AAKOMA Project. "I think what we don't do is acknowledge that the thing that we're describing is the anxiety, maybe the depression, maybe the residuals of trauma exposure. That's the part that we're not acknowledging because everyone doesn't have that language. And that's OK."

Andrea Bonior, licensed clinical psychologist and author of "Detox Your Thoughts," agreed. "The research actually really strongly shows that when we give a name to our feelings and we speak them out loud and we acknowledge our feelings, we feel like we can manage them better, because it gives us insight into what to do with them."

Some people may feel like they don't have a right to feel the way they do because others are going through more than them, but it's still important to put a label on that, said Bonior.

"Acknowledging that we're sad, acknowledging that we're feeling somewhat demoralized, acknowledging that we're scared, that actually helps us gain control and it illuminates the path forward."