Mother who had coronavirus finally cradles her baby girl after giving birth while in a coma

In this Friday, April 3, 2020, photo released by Paolo Hospital Samutprakarn, a nurse adjusts tiny face shield for a newborn baby to protect from new coronavirus at the newborn nursery of the hospital in Samutprakarn province, central Thailand. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (Paolo Hospital Samutprakarn via AP)
In this Friday, April 3, 2020, photo released by Paolo Hospital Samutprakarn, a nurse adjusts tiny face shield for a newborn baby to protect from new coronavirus at the newborn nursery of the hospital in Samutprakarn province, central Thailand. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (Paolo Hospital Samutprakarn via AP)

Angela Primachenko finally cradled her precious baby in her arms. The 27-year-old was put into a medically induced coma when she was 34 weeks pregnant, days into her battle with coronavirus.

When she woke up, her baby girl, Ava, was 5 days old, but she couldn't hold her just yet until she tested negative for coronavirus. She finally did Wednesday, and said she broke into tears when her daughter was placed in her arms.

"Crying right now," she posted on Instagram. "Our little sunshine is doing amazing!"

Primachenko lives in Vancouver, Washington, a state that made headlines when the coronavirus epidemic started in the United States. It's where the country's first coronavirus case was announced on January 21, where the first death nationwide occurred, and where dozens died at a nursing home at the beginning of the pandemic.

Like many who have caught the coronavirus, the respiratory therapist's symptoms began with a cough that escalated to a constant fever, she recalled.

"She knew the risk," said Oksana Luiten, her twin sister. "She took every precaution."

Her family encouraged her to get tested, and in the two days she waited for the result, she progressively got worse. It was positive.

"Being a respiratory therapist -- just being a human, I guess -- I knew I couldn't keep breathing the way I was and survive," she said.