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Harris County woman waiting almost a month for COVID-19 results

FILE - This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the virus causes COVID-19. A new type of coronavirus test offers a cheaper, quicker way to screen for infections, moving the U.S. toward the kind of mass screening that experts say is essential to returning millions of Americans to school and work. But the first so-called antigen test _ announced Saturday, may 9, 2020 by the Food and Drug Administration _ is not quite the kind sought by top government health officials. It is less accurate than the current gold standard for testing and can only be run on specialized equipment. (NIAID-RML via AP)
FILE - This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the virus causes COVID-19. A new type of coronavirus test offers a cheaper, quicker way to screen for infections, moving the U.S. toward the kind of mass screening that experts say is essential to returning millions of Americans to school and work. But the first so-called antigen test _ announced Saturday, may 9, 2020 by the Food and Drug Administration _ is not quite the kind sought by top government health officials. It is less accurate than the current gold standard for testing and can only be run on specialized equipment. (NIAID-RML via AP)

HOUSTON – Pamela Stephens did everything by the book. When she first discovered COVID-19 symptoms, she said she signed up to get tested.

She was tested at the Legacy mobile site in Katy, and the waiting game began.

Stephens said she has been waiting on her results for almost a month. With no one to turn to, she said she needs to know.

"I have responsibilities to the schools because I work at different schools to help out," she said. "I also have a grandson that's on the way. That's a newborn baby, and I wouldn't want him to come into contact with the virus."

KPRC 2 reached out to the Harris County Health Department, which oversees the Legacy testing site. The department didn't have any answers.

A spokesperson said there isn't a unified way of informing those who get tested, because different labs conduct the tests.

The county is asking anyone who has waited as long as Stephens to call the county's COVID-19 information number at 832-927-7575.

Stephens said since she got tested, she has been living in limbo.

“Knowing whether or not you have the virus is important because it doesn’t only impact your life, it impacts other people’s lives too,” she said.