Here’s what you need to know if you’ve lost your job

People line up outside the Utah Department of workforce Services Monday, April 13, 2020, in Salt Lake City. Congress, the Trump administration and the Federal Reserve have mounted the largest financial intervention in history a full-scale drive that includes mandating sick leave for some, distributing $1,200 checks to individuals, allocating rescue aid to employers and expanding unemployment benefits to try to help America survive the crisis. Yet those measures are only temporary. And for millions of newly unemployed, they may not be enough. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
People line up outside the Utah Department of workforce Services Monday, April 13, 2020, in Salt Lake City. Congress, the Trump administration and the Federal Reserve have mounted the largest financial intervention in history a full-scale drive that includes mandating sick leave for some, distributing $1,200 checks to individuals, allocating rescue aid to employers and expanding unemployment benefits to try to help America survive the crisis. Yet those measures are only temporary. And for millions of newly unemployed, they may not be enough. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

(CNN)Lost your job? You’re far from alone.

Around 22 million people -- roughly 13.5% of the US labor force -- have submitted initial unemployment claims since March 14 as the coronavirus pandemic decimates the US economy.

But the system has undergone unprecedented changes over the past month amid the outbreak.

Here’s what you need to know about applying for benefits:

Who qualifies

The rules vary by state, but typically workers who have lost their jobs through no fault of their own and have a minimum level of prior earnings from recent employment are eligible.

Until the pandemic, the jobless also had to be ready to take new positions immediately and be actively seeking work -- but state can now waive those requirements since hundreds of millions of Americans are staying home, and most states have closed nonessential businesses.

Many more jobless Americans are now temporarily eligible for benefits under the pandemic unemployment assistance program that Congress created last month as part of its $2.2 billion relief package.