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Ever wonder how the Houston Art Car parade got its start?

You've got to see this 300 square foot maze of art, right here in Houston!

The Orange Orange Show was opened by Jeff McKissack who built the structure of walkways, balconies, and arenas decorated with mosaics and brightly painted iron figures May 9, 1979. The materials used is common building materials and recycled junk such as bricks, tiles. Photograohed , Friday, March 15, 2013, in Houston. ( Nick de la Torre / Chronicle )
The Orange Orange Show was opened by Jeff McKissack who built the structure of walkways, balconies, and arenas decorated with mosaics and brightly painted iron figures May 9, 1979. The materials used is common building materials and recycled junk such as bricks, tiles. Photograohed , Friday, March 15, 2013, in Houston. ( Nick de la Torre / Chronicle )

HOUSTON – It took Houstonian Jeff McKissak 24 years to construct The Orange Show, a 3,000 square foot maze-like environment, only using building materials and found objects.

After McKissak's death, in 1980, local arts patron Marilyn Oshman formed a non-profit organization to preserve The Orange Show and McKissak's efforts to promote art within Houston communities.

Just 4 years later, The Orange Show Foundation commissioned an artist to build its first art car, the Fruitmoblie and deemed the car "a medium for self-expression".

In 1988, The Orange Show sponsored its first Houston Art Car Parade. Most would never have guessed that the small line of funny looking cars would grow into what we know today as the Houston Art Car Weekend.

For more information on The Orange Show and the Houston Art Car Parade Weekend, click here.