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Scientists working to create coronavirus vaccine

Neal Browning receives a shot in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, Monday, March 16, 2020, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. Browning is the second patient to receive the shot in the study. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Neal Browning receives a shot in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, Monday, March 16, 2020, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. Browning is the second patient to receive the shot in the study. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

HOUSTON – Just like the flu shot, a vaccine wouldn’t cure the illness but make the general population less is at risk to get it.

Scientists at Baylor College of Medicine and UTMB said they have a vaccine in the works but it needs more time to prove safety and efficacy.

John Price, CEO of Greffex, said engineering companies like his are coming up with their own approach, competing to see who can get theirs to the masses first.

“We have a responsibility to get the product out at the lowest cost or at no cost,” Price said.

The one thing all vaccine developers have in common is there waiting for the money to make it happen.

“Who’s arm wrestling for the $8.3 billion that’s coming in?” Price asked. “When it comes to testing, we don’t have the money to test, so the government will have to decide who gets the money to advance their candidate and then where.”

All safety checks for vaccines take time. Typically, it will take a year or more before something is ready to use in humans.