Photos that will touch you: Remembering this national photographer’s most vivid, touching shots

He was with Getty Images for more than 20 years. A collection of his most memorable work.

A man who wished not to be identified talks on a phone in a business that was destroyed by a tornado April 30, 2014 in Mayflower, Arkansas. Deadly tornadoes ripped through the region, leaving more than two dozen dead.
A man who wished not to be identified talks on a phone in a business that was destroyed by a tornado April 30, 2014 in Mayflower, Arkansas. Deadly tornadoes ripped through the region, leaving more than two dozen dead. (Getty Images)

Perhaps you don’t know him by name.

But you might have seen his work without realizing it.

Getty Images photographer Mark Wilson “worked for Getty Images for more than 20 years, covering four presidents, NASA launches, severe weather, NASCAR races, and general news assignments in the Washington D.C. area,” said Win McNamee, chief photographer for news at Getty.

McNamee recently shared that information with In Sight, adding that Wilson died Nov. 18 at home in Owings, Maryland, at the age of 65. The Washington Post wrote a touching piece on his sudden passing, as well, which you can read here.

While perusing the photo website this week, we realized Getty assembled a roundup of some of Wilson’s work, and thought it was worth sharing. In no particular order ...

An honor guard caisson team carries the casket of Captain Shane T. Adcock, 27, of Mechanicsville, Virginia, during a funeral service at Arlington Cemetery on Oct. 27, 2006 in Arlington, Virginia. Adcock was killed Oct. 11 in Hawijah, Iraq, from injuries suffered from an enemy grenade attack. (Getty Images)
Sam, Anne and Kyndra Hendrick have some fun jumping on a trampoline while the sun sets in the background on June 21, 2001 in Lower Marlboro, Maryland. (Getty Images)
The Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off from launch pad 39A on its way to the International Space Station June 8, 2007 from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral Florida. Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. (Getty Images)

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