82ºF

Inside Houston Audubon’s conservation efforts for birds

FILE - In this Dec. 22, 2010, file photo, a Northern Mocking Bird sits on a branch as birdwatchers scan the coast during the National Audubon Society's annual Christmas bird count on the Gulf Coast in Grand Isle, La. It's been 120 years since New York ornithologist Frank Chapman launched his Christmas Bird Count as a bold new alternative to what had been a longtime Christmas tradition of hunting birds. And the annual count continues, stronger and more important than ever. (AP Photo/Sean Gardner, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 22, 2010, file photo, a Northern Mocking Bird sits on a branch as birdwatchers scan the coast during the National Audubon Society's annual Christmas bird count on the Gulf Coast in Grand Isle, La. It's been 120 years since New York ornithologist Frank Chapman launched his Christmas Bird Count as a bold new alternative to what had been a longtime Christmas tradition of hunting birds. And the annual count continues, stronger and more important than ever. (AP Photo/Sean Gardner, File) (2010 AP)

HOUSTON – The Audubon Society of Houston is a nonprofit conservation dedicated to protecting the natural environment for birds and people.

Reps for Audubon Society say “Houston Audubon aims to inspire a culture of conservation and a way of life that allows us to thrive in harmony with nature. Our vision is the creation of a healthier, more beautiful place to live by leading and nurturing a community that values and supports birds.”

The Audubon Society has more than 15 sanctuary and center locations in the greater Houston-area.

Its Edith L. Moore Nature Sanctuary and Raptor and Education Center are located in the urban Houston-area.

At these facilities, guests have the opportunity to walk its trails, take a self-guided or take a guided tour.

Edith L. Moore Nature Sanctuary works to provide an urban wildlife sanctuary for native plants and animals and educate Houston visitors about the natural environment. According to representatives for the organization, "an average of 10,000 people participate in hands-on, environmental education programs at the sanctuary each year.”

For more information about the conservation, visit Houston Audubon online.


About the Author: