71ºF

Missing live music? Watch the Coachella documentary this weekend on YouTube

Couchella 2020 is here

HAIM perform on stage during Coachella Music Festival on April 11, 2014 in Coachella, United States. (Photo by Gaelle Beri/Redferns via Getty Images)
HAIM perform on stage during Coachella Music Festival on April 11, 2014 in Coachella, United States. (Photo by Gaelle Beri/Redferns via Getty Images) (2014 Gaelle Beri)

With reports that concerts might not come back to our normal lives until the fall of 2021, music fans are rightfully bummed about not being able to see their favorite artists live for what could be more than a year.

Some musicians have been trying to fill that void by doing short performances on social media, but as any person who loves live music knows, nothing will beat a concert.

So, what are we supposed to do until we have a better picture of when concerts will return?

Why not watch a music documentary about one of the best annual music festivals to exist, Coachella?

Over the years, Coachella has transformed to a place where being seen is slightly more important than who is taking the stage, but the festival has been around for 20 years, and back in the day, it was all about the music.

Not only does the documentary tell the story of how Coachella got its legs off the ground to become a mainstay in pop culture, but it shows some rare performances from some pretty legendary musicians, transporting you into the Indio desert for just a few special moments.

The documentary also takes you through how the genres of music have changed at the festival.

At the beginning, you get to see performances from rock royalty such as Rage Against The Machine, The White Stripes and Pixies.

But as music tastes change, so did the headliners at Coachella.

Pop superstars began to get booked like Madonna, which undoubtedly led to the bookings of Ariana Grande, Lady Gaga and the Queen B herself, Beyoncé.

The doc also tracks the introduction of rap and electronic music to the festival.

You’ll get to see performances from Jay-Z, Kendrick Lamar, Kanye West, Daft Punk and, of course, one of Coachella’s most shocking moments of all time, the hologram of Tupac during Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre’s headlining set in 2012.

It’s obviously not the same as being at a musical festival in real life, but given our current circumstances, it’s the next best thing until it’s safe enough to rock out at a concert again.

You can watch the entire documentary in the video below.


About the Author: